About your Search

20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10
widespread destruction in what was one of the deadliest attacks in the city in several months. >> moments after the blast, the military headquarters in the city came under mortar attacks. the government is blaming terrorists. >> syrian state tv broadcast images of the attack. the car bomb hit a security checkpoint near the headquarters of the ruling party and the russian embassy. opposition activists say most of the victims were civilians, though that cannot be confirmed. the blast damaged a number of cars and buildings in the surrounding area. >> this is terrorism. this is a crime. >> a huge cloud of smoke rose above the city center. shortly after that bombing, there were reports of at least two other explosions in the syrian capital. state media have described the attacks as the work of terrorists. the syrian opposition abroad like here in cairo believes the regime of the president has long been on the back foot. they are opposed to his latest offer of talks. >> it means nothing as long as our cities and people are being bombed and the regime continues to kill, imprisoned, and torture s
.3 tremor hit the city of christchurch two years ago. nearly 200 people died, including a number of foreign students. nhk world's takao nakajima shows us how the city is remembering and rebuilding. ♪ >> reporter: this is a park in central christchurch, people have gathered to commemorate two years from the february earthquake. >> as we remember the destructive and terrifying earthquake that struck this city and the surrounding area two years ago today. >> reporter: the quake killed 185 people. nearly two-thirds of them were in this building in the city center. it used to house an english language school. it was damaged far more severely than other structures. investigators blame design flaws. 28 japanese were among the victims. some of the relatives visited the site where the building once stood. kazuo horita lost his 19-year-old daughter. >> translator: i feel more painful this year than last year. we want to know why the building collapsed and who is responsible. this should be clarified for the sake of our dead children. >> crews are still rebuilding central christchurch. the area incl
-- mattresses, cooking stove, clothing. the 17-member family is from the region around the city a lot of -- teh city a -- the city aleppo. the farmer and his children fled three weeks ago from the advancing syrian army. none of them wants to give their names. >> look at this -- we had just got everything set up. but then the floods came and destroyed everything. we lost it all. we were promised a stove and a tent, but so far, no aid has come. >> initially, the united nations was providing aid to the unofficial camp, but no supplies have arrived for two weeks. more than 150 syrians are forced to live here. they need everything -- clothes and shoes for the children, food, mattresses, blankets. most of them had to buy their tents themselves, and even have to pay rent to pitch the tents. apart from one tank of drinking water, there is no sanitation. >> we eat bread and drink tea. sometimes, we buy flour and egg bread. we do not have anything anymore. sometimes we go hungry. sometimes not. we lost my daughter's pants in the flood. she needs new pants, but where am i supposed to get them? >> sometime
are demanding his overthrow after the demonstrations in several cities in recent days turn violent and dozens were killed. >> earlier in the day, there were scuffles in the center of tahrir square, the focal point of the revolution that overthrew president hosni mubarak two years ago. protests marking the second anniversary of the uprising that toppled mubarak have killed nearly 60 people since january 25, prompting the head of the army to warned this week that the state was on the verge of collapse. our correspondent is in cairo for us. we are hearing about water cannon shots being fired. how serious is the tension there at the moment? >> it basically escalated in the last hours. we have peaceful demonstrations at tahrri square and at the presidential palace, but demonstrators tried to break through the barriers at the international palace. police acted with tear gas, then the demonstrators threw molotov cocktails. we have the same blame game going on. the presidency says that the parties who organized the protest are responsible for today's violence while one of the opposition leaders said
the city of kidal. jean-yves le drian said they killed hundreds of insurgents. malian forces have detained several rebel leaders. le drian said the operation will continue until the malian government controls all of its territory. then he said the french would hand over the mission to units from african countries. french foreign minister laurent fabeu said he would consider withdrawi withdrawing personnel next month if the operation goes smoothly. >>> the leader of syria's opposition coalition has offered to hold talks. the head of the syrian national coalition made the offer in appearances on two television networks. >> translator: we will hold talks if the government accepts a political solution. >> khatib described the humanitarian situation as dire. he said that left the opposition with no option but to negotiate with assad. he proposed negotiations with assad's deputy, vice president farouk al sharaa. >>> people in greece aren't happy over how their lives have changed under a government austerity program. but government officials suggest they may have turned a corner. ai uchida joins
their windows to a haze of pollution and residents of other cities are seeing the same things. officials say nearly half the population has been affected by serious air pollution. the official said smog containing fine particulate matter has blanketed a quarter of the land. the air and about 70% of chinese cities doesn't meet environmental standards. each year 15 million more cars take to the road. government officials want to reduce the density of fine particulate matter in the atmosphere. a think tank says air pollution exceeded national standards for 27 days in january. people across china have their own opinions on what needs to be done. academics and residents shared some ideas in beijing. the group friends of nature hosted the debate. one par tticipant called for tighter control. another said the government should crackdown on companies that ignore environmental laws. they plan to submit proposals next month. >> translator: we want to the government to be transparent. >> the pollution has turned out to be an opportunity for one company in beijing. the firm is selling cans of fresh air
the country. supporters flooded the streets of tunis and other cities. there are reports of barricades being erected in clashes with police. >> news of the assassination sparked protests in several tunisian cities. in the capital, thousands of angry protesters followed the ambulance carrying belaid's body. many blame the islamists, an accusation the party denies. >> people know that the criminals are directly linked to the head of the party. >> all these islamist organizations of terrorist grou. history is a witness. it is not possible to discuss, negotiate, or agree with terrorists. the government has no other choice but to resign. otherwise, the tunisian people will topple them. they must step down. >> belaid was gunned down outside his home on wednesday. he headed the secular left- leaning patriots party. his allies said the killing was calculated to cause civil unrest. >> these people want to turn tunisian into another somalia. they want to see a spiral of violence in our country. we will not fall for that. chokri will not be the last march. >> in a speech to the european parliament, cal
will provide more specific data later. i would like to address people living in our city to ask him to remain -- aks them t -- ask them to remain calm. >> recovery crews are assessing the full scale of the damage, and scientists are hunting for degree to discover more about the media or that exploded in the sky. >> as we mentioned, there is a much bigger piece of space rock headed for the earth right this minute, but this one is all but certain to miss. >> we certainly hope so. still, it is being called the closest flyby of an asteroid this size ever recorded. it will zoom past our planet at a distance of about 27,000 kilometers, closer than many communications satellites. if the 45-meter rocket hit the earth, it could wipe out entire city. earlier, we spoke to a representative from the institut for physics, and we asked if there could be any scientific connection whatsoever between today's brushes with the universe. >> no, there is no connection between these events. the two celestial bodies have a completely different orbit, so there cannot be a physical connection. >> do we know what happe
of the city on their daily lives. urban pollution is spreading to the countryside, and it's affecting their health. but some japanese businesspeople have stepped in to help. nhk world has more from hanoi. >> reporter: vietnam's economy is racing ahead. but not everybody is moving forward. hanoi is crowded with motorbikes. across the country, people work with circumstances in the environment. this river running through tepco is dangerous. the environment readings are four times higher than recommended by the government. people living downstream are suffering the consequences. juan and his wife were born and raised in this village. they are farmers who survive by growing rice and other crops. the day is spent walking in the rice paddies. >> translator: the watery fill my paddies with is black. my legs itch from working in the rice fields. water shouldn't be black, but i have no choice but to use that terrible water for farming. >> reporter: there are many such worries about pollution. a new deal originating in japan is gaining public attention. the japan international corporation agency
companies in this region have been trying to switch to making different kinds of product. sabae, a city in western japan, makes 95% of japan's eyewear. but sales have dropped 30% since their peak in the '90s. that's because customers have been buying more eyewear products from chinese companies. their prices are lower. >> translator: in a few years, sabae could become the hub for making medical equipment. i hope that our products will help many doctors around the world. >> reporter: already the firm is gearing up to make those sales. and if competitors get on the bandwagon, a straggling industry may get a fresh start. nhk world, sabae. >>> the japanese government has been struggling to designate final disposal sites for radioactive waste generated by the fukushima radioactive accident. they oppose the idea of contaminated materials on their territory. now government officials said they'll rethink the way they select the storage sites. the environment ministry plans to ask each prefecture to dispose of contaminated mud and ash from incinerators on its territory. it's hoping to build new
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10